Hoosiers needing assistance regarding COVID-19 should email: CoronavirusHelp@braun.senate.gov

“My staff and I are here to help Hoosiers, and the following resource guides will help small-business owners, non-profit organizations, veterans, students, and employees across the state navigate the federal response to the coronavirus.  Again, it’s very important for Hoosiers to wash their hands, limit their time in public, help their neighbors, and together we will defeat the coronavirus." - Senator Mike Braun

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: Affected Business and Employee Resource Guide

  • The resources contained within this document are a culmination of state and federal efforts to combat the economic crisis created by the public health battle being waged against the novel coronavirus. For help on any issues related to COVID-19 please contact my office using
    CoronavirusHelp@braun.senate.gov.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: Housing Resources

  • A guide to housing related provisions in the CARES Act, including Temporary Moratorium on Eviction Filings, Foreclosure Moratorium and Consumer Right to Request Forbearance, Forbearance of Residential Mortgage Loan Payments for Multifamily Properties with Federally Backed Loans, and SBA Assistance for Landlords. 

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: Support for Non-Profit Organizations

  • The CARES Act provides non-profit organizations assistance during the COVID-19 pandemic primarily in two ways: provides support to certain nonprofit employers, and incentivizes charitable contributions.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: About The Paycheck Protection Program

  • The CARES Act creates a Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) for small employers, self- employed individuals, and “gig economy” workers. PPP provides 24 weeks of cash-flow assistance through 100% federally guaranteed loans to small employers who maintain their payroll during this emergency. If the employer maintains payroll, the portion of the loans used for covered payroll costs, interest on mortgage obligations, rent, and utilities can be forgiven. This proposal is retroactive to February 15, 2020. The CARES Act provided $350 billion to mitigate challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. On April 23, 2020, Congress approved an additional $310 billion for the PPP and an additional $60 billion for the Economic Disaster Injury Loan (EIDL).

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: Defense-Related Provisions

  • The CARES Act includes $10.5 billion for the Department of Defense to support the military’s response to the Coronavirus and ensure we protect our forces during this vulnerable time in our history. Notable appropriations are listed below.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: About Direct Support Payments to Americans

  • Who is eligible for a recovery rebate? All U.S. residents with adjusted gross income under $75,000 ($112,500 for head of household and $150,000 married), who are not the dependent of another taxpayer and have a work-eligible Social Security Number, are eligible for the full $1,200 ($2,400 married) rebate. They are also eligible for an additional $500 per child. A typical family of four is eligible for a $3,400 recovery rebate.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: Education-Related Provisions

  • Stipulates that borrowers will not accumulate interest on student loans for three months, and do not have to make payments on those loans.

Congressional Response to Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Outbreak: Health Care Systems, Treatments & Vaccines

  • Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act (Phase 1): On March 6, 2020, President Trump signed into law an $8.3 billion in emergency funding to combat COVID-19. The package provides critical funding to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in response to COVID-19, as well as funding to: help develop vaccines and treatments for COVID-19, enable the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) to procure personal protective equipment (PPE), ventilators, and other medical supplies; and give states the boost in the resources needed to combat the virus.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: Provisions related to Veterans

  • The Department of Veterans’ Affairs (VA) is receiving $19.6 Billion through the Cares Act. The VA serves as a backup health system in times of crisis—often referred to as the VA’s 4th mission. These funds will help ensure continuity of service to our Veterans, including homeless and low income Veterans, and prepare for the possibility of being activated for 4th mission.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: Provisions related to Agriculture

  • On April 17, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced policies to implement the $24 billion in relief provided to the agency through the CARES Act and the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA)2 . This funding is intended to compensate producers who have suffered losses due to market conditions caused by COVID-19. This funding is in addition to the second and third tranche of Market Facilitation Payments related to trade aid.

  • Note: As of April 19, USDA notes that it will soon release details regarding eligibility, rates, and other implementation. This document will be updated accordingly.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: Employee Retention Credit FAQ

  • Any employer, regardless of size, is eligible for the credit during calendar year 2020 if the business: (1) is fully or partially suspended due to a governmental order related to COVID-19, or (2) experiences a significant decline in gross receipts (i.e., a reduction of 50 percent of gross receipts from the same quarter in 2019). The credit also applies to tax-exempt organizations if the operation of the organization is fully or partially suspended due to the circumstances described in (1) above. The credit generally does not apply to governmental employers, including the U.S. Government, state and local governments, or any agency of the foregoing.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: What Workers Need to Know about Paid and Family Leave Provisions

  • This new law has a simple goal: stop the spread of the virus by giving workers and employers the support needed. The law provides paid sick leave and paid family leave to address work and employment interruptions related to the COVID-19 coronavirus. Both benefits are funded dollar-for-dollar for employers through a refundable tax credit program administered by the Internal Revenue Service.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: What Employers Need to Know about Paid and Family Leave Provisions

  • Families First provides paid sick leave and paid family leave to address work and employment interruptions related to the COVID-19 coronavirus.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: About Health Care

  • On March 27, 2020, President Trump signed into law the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act (CARES Act). This $2 trillion package provides resources designed to help businesses stay open and keep workers connected to their jobs—therefore keeping them connected to employer-sponsored benefits such as health insurance. However, if you have lost your health care coverage, or if you are having financial troubles in connection to COVID19, this document answers common questions about health care coverage.

  • In addition to the resources below, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) will use funding allocated by Congress to specifically pay providers to treat uninsured COVID- 19 patients. As a condition for receiving this funding, providers will be forbidden from balance billing the uninsured for the cost of their care. Every health care provider who has provided treatment for uninsured COVID-19 patients on or after February 4, 2020, can request claims reimbursement through the program and will be reimbursed at Medicare rates, subject to available funding. Providers can register for the program on April 27, 2020, and begin submitting claims in early May 2020. Click here for more information.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: Main Street Lending Program

  • Section 4003 of the CARES Act authorized a Main Street Lending Program to provide needed liquidity to small and medium sized businesses. To implement this section, the Federal Reserve has outlined the program and is seeking comment on its provisions to support the flow of credit to American workers and businesses impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. This program will enable up to $600 billion in new financing for businesses with up to 10,000 employees or $2.5 billion in 2019 annual revenues. According to Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, the Main Street Lending Facility will cover 40,000 medium-sized businesses that employ 35 million Americans.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act: About State and Local Government Support

  • The CARES Act provides $150 billion for States, Tribal governments, and units of local governments. Within that, $3 billion is marked for the District of Columbia and U.S. territories and $8 billion for Tribal governments. The section also provides definitions for use of funds as well as oversight authority by Inspector General (IG) from the Department of Treasury.